“Peanuts Nuthouse”

Last night I played at “Peanuts ” in New Smyrna Beach, Florida. I was not really ‘on’. Some gigs are like that. I just didn’t feel right. Then when it came my time to get on stage I had to bring a stool up to sit on. I almost fell getting it up on the stage. Then the girl organizing the show put the stool about two inches from the edge of the stage. I positioned myself to get ready to play but the back of the stool forced me to sit kind of forward. The result was I couldn’t sit comfortably and see the fretboard of the guitar. I have to play by looking where I am on the neck because some of my instrumental work is complicated. Anyway I struggled with songs. The amplifier was not the greatest either, putting out a crummy sound.

The experience of playing “Peanuts” was fun Sunday, but last night was a different story. I don’t think I’m going back there.

Max at Peanuts 2


Seth & Addy

About three weeks have passed since my granddaughter was born. She is such a sweet little baby! My son and daughter-in-law have been very good with Adelynn. Of course her mother, Nita, is tired a lot from the constant attention our newborn needs. Today Seth, Nita and Addy are going to the midwife’s house for a scheduled appointment. We all hope Addy will get a clean bill of health. Here’s a picture of my son, Seth, cradling Adelynn in his arms. Welcome to the world little Adelynn Claire MacPherson!

Father and daughter together 17 days after her birth. Addy was born on my father's birthday. He would have been 101 years old!

Father and daughter together 17 days after her birth. Addy was born on my father’s birthday. He would have been 101 years old!


Guitar Neck Resetting

I bought a 1946 Martin 000-18 acoustic guitar about six months ago. The person I bought it from told me the neck would need resetting to bring the strings down closer to the neck so it would be easier to play, especially in the higher registers. I took the guitar down to Exeter, New Hampshire to Pat DiBurro, a luthier with a good reputation, especially proficient with resetting necks. The job involved steaming the portion of the Martin around where the neck meets the body of the guitar. This actually allows the neck to be lifted off  the body. Once Pat shaved the neck he glued the neck back onto the body. I had to wait three months to get the guitar back from Pat, as he had a backlog of work for doing work on guitars. Below is a photo of what the body of my 000-18 looked like after the neck was removed. Pat also had to steam off the bridge as it was lifting up a bit when I bought it. The he glued it back on the guitar.

Photo of 1946 Martin 000-18 guitar after the removal of the neck

Photo of 1946 Martin 000-18 guitar after the removal of the neck


1891 Martin Style 17 ‘Parlor’ Guitar

I bought this guitar about four months ago. It has nylon strings, but with a narrow neck (definitely not a ‘classical’ guitar). The guitar was the same model as the one Mark Twain (Samuel Clements) played when he toured the western states back in the 19th century. He was reputedly very adept at playing the instrument and the ladies loved him! The actual 1891 Martin Style 17 that he played is now in a museum. It was last purchased for 15 million dollars!. I play the same style guitar but did not pay that much money for it. Then again… I’m not Mark Twain! Below is a photo I took of this 1891 (123 years old) inside of its original ‘coffin’ case. The coffin cases were very typical for Martin guitars back in the early days. They were sometimes sold separately for a whopping $3.50!

1891 Martin 'Style 17' 2 1/2 acoustic guitar with nylon strings and coffin case.

1891 Martin ‘Style 17′ 2 1/2
acoustic guitar with nylon strings and coffin case.